Film Directing SHOTS

One of the most over used cliches in film is "The Shots are all you have." Film Directing SHOTS: The following are what you need to think about practically so you can think creatively and device the best shot list you possibly can:


QUESTIONS TO ASK?
-What is the best viewpoint for filming this position of the event?
-How much area should be included in this shot?

SCENE - Defines the place or setting where the action is laid
SHOT - Defines a continuous view filmed by one camera without interuption
SEQUENCE - A series of scenes or shot complete in itself


TYPES OF CAMERA ANGLES
OBJECTIVE - The audience point of view
SUBJECTIVE - The camera acts as the viewers eyes-movement
POINT OF VIEW - What the character is seeing


SIX BASIC SHOTS

1) Extreme Long Shot
Taken at a great distance. Almost always an exterior shot and shows much of the locale. Used a lot in Establishing shots

2) Long Shot
The distance between the audience and the stage in the live theatre

3) Full Shot
Barely including the whole body

4) Medium Shot
Knees to waste up. Useful for exposition scenes, carrying movement and for dialogue

5) Close Up
Concentrates on a relatively small object. HUMAN FACE

6) Extreme Close-Up
Might just show eyes or mouth


CAMERA ANGLES

Are the most important factor in producing illusion of scenic depth.Which angle the object is photographed.



FIVE BASIC ANGLES

EYE LEVEL SHOTS- Provide frames of reference. Audience sees the event as if the scene happening right in front of them. Most scenes in movies are photographed from eye level. 5 to 6 feet off the ground. Capturing the clearest view of an object
-Used to treat your characters as equals. Discourages viewers at judging them. Permits audience to make up their own mind.

BIRDS EYE VIEW- Photographing a scene from DIRECTLY OVERHEAD. Hovers from ABOVE like all powerful gods. IDEA OF FATE

HIGH ANGLED SHOTS- Camera is tilted downward. Besides the obvious power shot, movement is slowed down during fast moving action. Ground is in the background. A person seems harmless and insignificant is photographed from above.
-The higher the angle, the more it tends to imply fatality

LOW ANGLES SHOTS- Camera it titled upwards. Use to inspire awe or excitement. Motion in speeded up. Environment is usually minimized. Sky or ceiling is background.
-Heightens the importance of a subject. Scenes depicting heroism

OBLIQUE ANGLE- Lateral tilt of the camera. As though the object is about to fall to one side. Point of view shots. Suggests tension, transitions, impending movement
-Image that slants to the right – Acting Forceful
-Image that slants to the left – Weak, Static


ASK YOURSELF

-How much should be included in this shot?
-Where should the camera be positioned to view this particular part of the action?

A SHOT SHOULD BE HELD NO LONGER THAN REQUIRED TO MAKE ITS POINT

Approach each sequence with a fresh attitude and strive to treat the action in an individual matter.

A definite change in camera angles will assure a smother flow of images


CLOSE-UPS

-Among the most powerful storytelling devices available to the filmmaker
-Allows removal of tedious or repetitious action
-Can be used to provide a time laspe
-Brings that dramatic punch

FRAMES-Area near the top of the frame can suggest ideas dealing with power, authority and apiration
-Left and right edges of the frame can suggest insignificance
-Dominant Contrast - Area the immediately attracts our attention because of a conspicuous and compelling contrast
-Subsidiary Contrast - Structured image so that specific images are followed in sequence

THE HUMAN EYE SCANS PICTURES FROM LEFT TO RIGHT

HORIZONTAL LINES - MOVE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT
VERTICAL LINES - MOVE FROM TOP TO BOTTOM

DIAGONAL OR OBLIQUE LINES tend to sweep upward

TERRITORIAL SPACE - Movie images must tell a story in time, a story that involves human beings and their problems

THREE VISUAL PLACES

-Midground
-Foreground
-Background

CRUCIAL DECISION - How much detail should be included within the frame?

HOW CLOSE SHOULD WE GET TO THE SUBJECT?
-How much space is just right for the shot?
-What’s too much or too little


AN ACTOR CAN BE PHOTOGRAPHED IN FIVE BASIC POSITION

1) Full Front - Facing the camera
-Most intimate, vulnerabilities exposed
-Audience agrees to become his chosen confidante

2) Quarter Turn
-Involves a high degree of intimacy but with less emotional involvement

3) PROFILE - Looking off frame, left to right
-Character lost in their own thoughts

4) Three Quarter Turn
-More anonymous. Rejecting audiences

5) Back to Camera-Characters alienation from the world. Sense of concealment, mystery

Tightly framed shots - CONFINED

Loosely framed shots - FREEDOM


USING SPACE IN FOUR WAYS

1)INTIMATE
Eighteen inches away. Distance of LOVE, COMFORT, TENDERNESS between individuals

2)PERSONAL
-Eighteen inches to about four feet away. Reserved for friends and acquaintances

3)SOCIAL
-Four feet to about twelve feet away. Business and casual social gatherings

4)PUBLIC

-Twelve to about twenty feet away

8 comments:

Shawn Smith said...

Thank you very much, appreciate the info, keep posting

Unknown said...

Great thumbnail list. Something to have on the bulletin board when composing shot list. Thanks!

Raj Solanki said...

That was really an interesting and informative post. Thanks for sharing the article with us.
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Pawan Kumar said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
kempraj raj said...

very nice for a basic learner.....I think i got little knowledge on film making... Thank you...

Hitesh Mundepi said...

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